segregation

Desegregating Play

Desegregating Play

This week, as we recall the legacy of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., segregation is at the top of my mind. During the era of formalized segregation in pre-Civil Rights Movement America segregation was maintained through “whites only” signs at pools, restaurants, and parks, as well as “Sundown” laws and Redlining in American towns and cities. While the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1968 has made explicit segregation illegal, de facto segregation remains.

Even though most White people would never say something like, “I don’t want my children to play with poor black kids,” the way their neighborhoods, schools, and extracurricular activities are set up achieve this same effect.

Shoulda, Woulda, Coulda: A Guide for Adults To Help Their Child Be A Neighbor

Shoulda, Woulda, Coulda: A Guide for Adults To Help Their Child Be A Neighbor

At this very moment, there are grown-ups that resent, ignore, hesitate, or down-right fear touching the subject of race. A feeling that “enough has been said,” a sense that “others can deal with it,” or a belief that “it is here to stay even if something should change.” But as the hands of time continue to tick generation after generation, the same jack-in-the-box keeps popping up because adults can’t control an itch to turn the handle of hatred.

Back-to-School Action Plan: Join the PTA

Back-to-School Action Plan: Join the PTA

Many families who attend our Kids & Race workshops come away inspired to make changes in their community but are unsure what steps to take. Personal reflection, talking with friends and family about racial issues, attending protests, and writing to representatives are all great ways to make positive contributions toward racial equity. But one of the biggest areas where we can have an impact is in our public schools.