culture

Final Five Clues for Black History Scavenger Hunt

Final Five Clues for Black History Scavenger Hunt

Well, snowpocalypse threw a wrench into our February, but we want to at least give you all five more Black History Scavenger Hunt clues, for a total of 10. We’re also extending our Scavenger Hunt deadline until midnight on Saturday, March 9th. That gives your team 1.5 weekends to win this thing and bring home the big prize for your organization!

Explore Seattle’s Black History with these Scavenger Hunt Sites

Explore Seattle’s Black History with these Scavenger Hunt Sites

Kids and Race is celebrating Black History Month with a fun game of Black History Scavenger Hunt all around Seattle. Join together with friends, other families, or your coworkers to compete. Read each clue and then head to that location. Take a photo at that site and upload it to Instagram with the hashtag #blackhistoryscavhunt . The team with the most photos and shares will win a $500 grant to the community organization of their choice.

Is “Spiderman: Into the Spiderverse” the Antidote to Toxic Masculinity?

Is “Spiderman: Into the Spiderverse” the Antidote to Toxic Masculinity?

“That’s not the real Captain America. The real Captain America is White,” my son declared upon seeing a coloring page of Sikh Captain America.

At six years old, Adam is both very literal and very obsessed with superheroes. When Adam and his four-year-old brother play, they yell, “Hulk angry! Hulk smash!” They adopt Batman’s gravelly voice and the stoic attitude. They gravitate toward Halloween costumes with plush muscles sewn onto their tiny chests and arms. My husband and I try to speak openly with our kids about race and racism, about gender stereotypes and toxic masculinity, but I worry that our kids’ obsession with superheroes may be undermining what we are trying to teach them.

Learning Identity and Tolerance from Holiday Traditions

Learning Identity and Tolerance from Holiday Traditions

America is such a large country that it’s easy to forget that there is a world outside of it. American culture and media have seeped into other countries and we can begin to believe that our traditions are universal, when in fact, they are very particular to our time and place.

The problem comes when kids grow up thinking “My tradition is the correct way” instead of “my tradition is one of many different traditions. My tradition can be special to me, but I can also recognize that other peoples’ traditions are special, too.”

Ask Kids and Race: What Do I Tell My Kid About Thanksgiving?

Ask Kids and Race: What Do I Tell My Kid About Thanksgiving?

Dear Kids & Race: My preschooler is asking questions about Thanksgiving. What should I tell him?

This is a great question. When most of us were growing up, we learned a lot of inaccurate stories about Native Americans. We learned, for example, that the Pilgrims were good, albeit hapless, people fleeing religious persecution who survived their first winter in Massachusetts due to friendship with the Wampanoag, most notably Squanto.