Final Five Clues for Black History Scavenger Hunt

Final Five Clues for Black History Scavenger Hunt

Well, snowpocalypse threw a wrench into our February, but we want to at least give you all five more Black History Scavenger Hunt clues, for a total of 10. We’re also extending our Scavenger Hunt deadline until midnight on Saturday, March 9th. That gives your team 1.5 weekends to win this thing and bring home the big prize for your organization!

Explore Seattle’s Black History with these Scavenger Hunt Sites

Explore Seattle’s Black History with these Scavenger Hunt Sites

Kids and Race is celebrating Black History Month with a fun game of Black History Scavenger Hunt all around Seattle. Join together with friends, other families, or your coworkers to compete. Read each clue and then head to that location. Take a photo at that site and upload it to Instagram with the hashtag #blackhistoryscavhunt . The team with the most photos and shares will win a $500 grant to the community organization of their choice.

Desegregating Play

Desegregating Play

This week, as we recall the legacy of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., segregation is at the top of my mind. During the era of formalized segregation in pre-Civil Rights Movement America segregation was maintained through “whites only” signs at pools, restaurants, and parks, as well as “Sundown” laws and Redlining in American towns and cities. While the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1968 has made explicit segregation illegal, de facto segregation remains.

Even though most White people would never say something like, “I don’t want my children to play with poor black kids,” the way their neighborhoods, schools, and extracurricular activities are set up achieve this same effect.

Kids and Race Presents: MLK Day March for Play

Kids and Race Presents: MLK Day March for Play

What can we do as parents and educators to honor the memory of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and the brave men and women who fought for civil rights and equality for all Americans?

There are many ways to honor Dr. King’s legacy: we can read books, we can take part in a protest or a day of community service. But we at Kids and Race have a new vision for how we can continue the work of finding our shared humanity with people who are different from us: play.

We invite you to join us for the first annual MLK Day of Play, Monday, January 21st, 1:00pm at Ravenna Playfield.

Is “Spiderman: Into the Spiderverse” the Antidote to Toxic Masculinity?

Is “Spiderman: Into the Spiderverse” the Antidote to Toxic Masculinity?

“That’s not the real Captain America. The real Captain America is White,” my son declared upon seeing a coloring page of Sikh Captain America.

At six years old, Adam is both very literal and very obsessed with superheroes. When Adam and his four-year-old brother play, they yell, “Hulk angry! Hulk smash!” They adopt Batman’s gravelly voice and the stoic attitude. They gravitate toward Halloween costumes with plush muscles sewn onto their tiny chests and arms. My husband and I try to speak openly with our kids about race and racism, about gender stereotypes and toxic masculinity, but I worry that our kids’ obsession with superheroes may be undermining what we are trying to teach them.

Learning Identity and Tolerance from Holiday Traditions

Learning Identity and Tolerance from Holiday Traditions

America is such a large country that it’s easy to forget that there is a world outside of it. American culture and media have seeped into other countries and we can begin to believe that our traditions are universal, when in fact, they are very particular to our time and place.

The problem comes when kids grow up thinking “My tradition is the correct way” instead of “my tradition is one of many different traditions. My tradition can be special to me, but I can also recognize that other peoples’ traditions are special, too.”

Shoulda, Woulda, Coulda: A Guide for Adults To Help Their Child Be A Neighbor

Shoulda, Woulda, Coulda: A Guide for Adults To Help Their Child Be A Neighbor

At this very moment, there are grown-ups that resent, ignore, hesitate, or down-right fear touching the subject of race. A feeling that “enough has been said,” a sense that “others can deal with it,” or a belief that “it is here to stay even if something should change.” But as the hands of time continue to tick generation after generation, the same jack-in-the-box keeps popping up because adults can’t control an itch to turn the handle of hatred.